TTD Page

This is our ThingsToDo page…later to be migrated to Basecamp CoSMM when it’s for more public consumption:

Event ideas:

CategoryIdeaDescriptionEquipmentRisks
EventLocal Offa-ings"Offa-ing ideas" An event where local schools, clubs, groups, etc. are invited along to see the designs with cakes, coffees/teas (and perhaps judge them?) and the Micro-CoSMM scrapbook (or online blog from the web site from the things you have sent us)
Raffle, cakes, refreshments, projector, organised walk, playing our Podcasts, etc.
Venue, permission, funding, etc.None
EventCrafty Offa-ingsArrange an arts and crafts day that is Offa's/Wat's dyke related.
Initially at the Offa's Dyke Centre (later at other locations on along the dyke), the event could last no more than 6 hours (10am-4pm) and have a small art exhibition of photographs, painting, sculptures, etc. with "guess the location" raffle and refreshments with cakes based on the dyke(s), Saxons, dyke creation, etc.
Prizes to the best 3 public artworks or cakes and the nearest correct answer for the location of the artwork.
Coffee/tea-making facilities, plates and cutlery, table wear, facilities for displaying the artwork (telly for multimedia displays if necessary).Generic health and safety for the venue and public access to hot food & drink
Tidying up afterwards
ExperimentalDesign a dykeExperimental archaeology: Get the local schools/colleges/clubs, etc. to design a dyke looking at the designs from the archaeological record.
Design a dyke that could be built at a local venue perhaps - even a model at a school
Pens, paper, modeling tools, etc.
ExperimentalBuild a dykeExperimental archaeology: 3m by 5m deep with the ramp up the 5m stretch at an angle to the viewing point so the visitors can see the dyke and what it showed and obscured
Ideally the first would be at the Knighton Offa's Dyke Centre with a camera from the centre looking at the structure and taking photos periodically - time-lapse or streaming video
Timber, chalk, soil, mattock, safety gear (from local builders?), manpower (local builders?), etc.Data Protection
Local authority permission, warning signs, heritage notice board, etc. (aided by and through the project)
LiaisonLocal contactsPlease list the local contacts in schools, colleges, clubs, associations, colleges, guide/scout groups, local press, local businesses (perhaps for sponsorship), etc. that you feel would be helpfulNotesNone
LiaisonMicro-CoSMM meetingsOrganise meetings between us and the CoSMM.coordinators and invite other locals to show what's been done - using resources you've fed back to CoSMMOut
Could be via Skype or Facebook chat or a mixture of, say, Offa's Dyke Centre meeting room and online chat/skype
To Be Decided
Venue if necessary
None
LiaisonProject updates/liasisonLiaison with us about ideas you or your group has had.
Anything of interest in the local area?
Any concerns about planning, etc. that we may be able to help with
Venue, skype/social mediaNone
ProjectChain ReactionA group of volunteers photograph themselves on the dyke from distances of 20m between people (the 1st at a fixed point).
Then turn around and photograph the person behind them
Digital camera's or smartphonesData Protection
Care to time it photos so the 'next' person you are photographing stays still until the shot is taken.
Ensure the (rough) distance is noted
ProjectPersonal HistorysKids (with chaparone if necessary) take recording devices and interview older local residents to see what they remember about living near the dyke and when their forefathers (and/or friends) took them to walk or play around the dykePen & paper
recorder (smartphone or other hand-held recorder)
Data Protection
Accompanied by adult/chaparone/teacher
ProjectFixed point photographyAt fixed points along the dyke, take photos towards the 4 points of the compass.
Note the time and date (time of year) and in what direction for each photo in a log
Photos to be taken at regular intervals (say, once per month?)
Note: Fixed points to be discussed by CoSMM & coordinators with Offa's Dyke Path officer
Camera or smartphoneEnsure the notes are made of the direction, date and time
Ensure they are on the path not the monument where possible
MarketingODA
Offa's Dyke Ale
Contact a local brewery with the ODA-at-50 logo to put on one or more ales (about 3% - 5% hoppy to strong session)To Be DecidedCost
Distribution
Lead-in time
ProjectViewpoint photographyLike Fixed Point Photgraphy but taken from away from the dyke towards the fixed pointCamera or smartphoneEnsure the notes are made of which fixed point, date and time
Ensure they are not on the monument where possible
Outreach50 events in the 50th anniversaryTo Be DecidedCosts
Advertising news of the events
Calendar and news coverage
Timescales

Links:

    • http://caf.archaeologyuk.org/wikka.php?wakka=HowtoRegister – have followed that and emailed them
    • http://caf.archaeologyuk.org/wikka.php?wakka=GettingStarted has loads of links and how-tos
    • https://historicengland.org.uk/services-skills/heritage-action-zones/ –
    • https://antiquity.ac.uk/ World archaeology
    • http://www.moorsforthefuture.org.uk/community-science Community science
  • Community research publications  http://www.moorsforthefuture.org.uk/research-publications
NameLink/description
References
Care on a siteThose taking part in the project maybe archaeologists, walkers, cyclists or "normal people" (visitors or enthusiasts). Please don't put yourself at risk of the elements…

Melanie's talk at TAG 2017TAG (Theoretical Archaeology Group) 2017, Cardiff.
Melanie's talk
CORS The CORS project report

TRPGTrefonen Rural Protection Group
 - the inaugural group for the CoSMM model of outreach.
Heritage scheme fundinghttp://www.stiperstonesandcorndon.co.uk/about-the-scheme/partners-and-funding/
World Archaeology reviewsAntiquity, Department of Archaeology - search for reviews of world archaeology.

This is an example page. It’s different from a blog post because it will stay in one place and will show up in your site navigation (in most themes). Most people start with an About page that introduces them to potential site visitors. It might say something like this:

Hi there! I’m a bike messenger by day, aspiring actor by night, and this is my website. I live in Los Angeles, have a great dog named Jack, and I like piña coladas. (And gettin’ caught in the rain.)

…or something like this:

The XYZ Doohickey Company was founded in 1971, and has been providing quality doohickeys to the public ever since. Located in Gotham City, XYZ employs over 2,000 people and does all kinds of awesome things for the Gotham community.

As a new WordPress user, you should go to your dashboard to delete this page and create new pages for your content. Have fun!


We have zotero so we can insert references … e.g. Landscape archaeology and GIS is a good book 


and maps so we can geo-locate areas of concern or fixed-point photography points

Export as KML for Google Earth/Google MapsOpen standalone map in fullscreen modeCreate QR code image for standalone map in fullscreen modeExport as GeoJSONExport as GeoRSS
Offa's Dyke

loading map - please wait...

Offa\'s Dyke Centre: 52.345958, -3.051882
Trefonen: 52.834610, -3.101621
Knighton (Offa\'s Dyke Centre): 52.345735, -3.051844
CoSMM - Knighton group: 52.345735, -3.051844
Newcastle on Clun: 52.436944, -3.094876
Newcastle on Clun - truncation: 52.435522, -3.095012
M-T1: 52.836629, -3.103382
M-T2: 52.838466, -3.104158
T-T1: 52.836629, -3.103382
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Offa's Dyke Centre

The Offa's Dyke Centre
West Street, Knighton, Wales. LD7 1EN
The Offa's Dyke Centre

 

West Street, Knighton LD7 1EN, United Kingdom
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Trefonen

Trefonen in Oswestry.  A lovely quiet town with a good local pub with a long history and surrounded by the Dyke.

Please see the Trefonen group page

Trefonen, Oswestry, United Kingdom
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Knighton (Offa's Dyke Centre)

The Offa's Dyke Centre
West Street, Knighton, Wales. LD7 1EN
The Offa's Dyke Centre

 

West Street, Knighton LD7 1EN, United Kingdom
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CoSMM - Knighton group

Knighton group

West Street, Knighton LD7 1EN, United Kingdom
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Newcastle on Clun

Newcastle on Clun.
The Dyke and path skirt round buildings and down the field to cross the Clun River.

Newcastle on Clun, Craven Arms, UK
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Newcastle on Clun - truncation

Newcastle on Clun.
 

A lovely walk however the Dyke has suffered from natural erosion so needs monitoring

Newcastle on Clun, Craven Arms, UK
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M-T1

[M] - Monitor
[T] - Trefonen
[#] - number of threat

52.8337877,-3.1021968,
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M-T2

[M] - Monitor
[T] - Trefonen
[#] - number of threat

52.8337877,-3.1021968,
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T-T1

[M] - Monitor ; [T] - Trefonen ;  [#] - number of threat
Please see Trefonen-Threats

52.8337877,-3.1021968,


and tables

AgesStartEndStart CorrectionTypeStart (cor)End (cor)DurationHuman SpeciesGeological PeriodAllNotesNotesNotable Name       
Formation of Earth-4,600,000,000BPEvolution-4,600,001,950-1,9504,600,000,000Formation of the planet Earth
Archean-3,800,000,000-2,500,000,000BPPeriod-3,800,001,950-2,500,001,9501,300,000,000:
living cells-3,500,000,000BPEvolution-3,500,001,950-1,9503,500,000,000Living cells
eukaryotic cells-1,400,000,000BPEvolution-1,400,001,950-1,9501,400,000,000eukaryotic cells
Cryogenian-850,000,000-635,000,000BPPeriod-850,001,950-635,001,950215,000,000:
multi-cellular life, Ediacara-700,000,000BPEvolution-700,001,950-1,950700,000,000Multi-cellular creatures
animals with shells - Cambrian-570,000,000BPEvolution-570,001,950-1,950570,000,000animals with shells - Cambrian
vertebrates-500,000,000BPEvolution-500,001,950-1,950500,000,000Vertebrates
first land vertebrates-380,000,000BPEvolution-380,001,950-1,950380,000,000first land vertebrates
dinosaurs dominate-200,000,000-65,000,000BPEvolution-200,001,950-65,001,950135,000,000dinosaurs dominate
first mammals-200,000,000BPEvolution-200,001,950-1,950200,000,000first mammals
‘age of mammals begins-65,000,000BPEvolution-65,001,950-1,95065,000,000‘age of mammals begins
Sahelanthropus tchadensis-7,000,000-6,000,000BPEvolution-7,001,950-6,001,9501,000,000Sahelanthropus tchadensisSahelanthropus tchadensis: West-Central Africa (Chad)Sahelanthropus tchadensisWest-Central Africa (Chad)
Pleistocene-7,000,000BPPeriod-7,001,950-1,9507,000,000Pleistocene:
Earliest hominids-7,000,000BPEvolution-7,001,950-1,9507,000,000PleistoceneEarliest hominids
Orrorin tugenensis-6,200,000-5,800,000BPEvolution-6,201,950-5,801,950400,000Orrorin tugenensisPleistoceneMillenium Man: Eastern Africa (Tugen Hills, central Kenya)Millenium ManEastern Africa (Tugen Hills, central Kenya)
Ardipithecus kadabba-5,800,000-5,200,000BPEvolution-5,801,950-5,201,950600,000Ardipithecus kadabbaPleistoceneArdipithecus kadabba: Eastern Africa (Middle Awash Valley, Ethiopia)Ardipithecus kadabbaEastern Africa (Middle Awash Valley, Ethiopia)
Pliocene-5,300,000-2,600,000BPPeriod-5,301,950-2,601,9502,700,000Pliocene:
Ardipithecus ramidus-4,400,000-430,000BPEvolution-4,401,950-431,9503,970,000Ardipithecus ramidusPlioceneArdi: Eastern Africa (Middle Awash and Gona, Ethiopia)ArdiEastern Africa (Middle Awash and Gona, Ethiopia)
Australopithecus anamensis-4,200,000-3,900,000BPEvolution-4,201,950-3,901,950300,000Australopithecus anamensisPlioceneAustralopithecus anamensis: Eastern Africa (Lake Turkana, Kenya and Middle Awash, Ethiopia)Australopithecus anamensisEastern Africa (Lake Turkana, Kenya and Middle Awash, Ethiopia)
Australopithecus afarensis-3,850,000-2,950,000BPEvolution-3,851,950-2,951,950900,000Australopithecus afarensis: "Lucy"PlioceneLucy's species: Eastern Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania)Lucy's speciesEastern Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania)
Kenyanthropus platyops-3,500,000-3,400,000BPEvolution-3,501,950-3,401,950100,000Kenyanthropus platyopsPlioceneKenyanthropus platyops: Eastern Africa (West Turkana, Kenya)Kenyanthropus platyopsEastern Africa (West Turkana, Kenya)
Lomekwian-3,300,000BPCulture-3,301,950-1,9503,300,000LomekwianStoneage tools in East Africa: Earliest napped tools appear. "Nutcracker man" from West Turkana, KenyaStoneage tools in East AfricaEarliest napped tools appear. "Nutcracker man" from West Turkana, Kenya
Australopithecus africanus-3,300,000-2,100,000BPEvolution-3,301,950-2,101,9501,200,000Australopithecus africanusPlioceneA.Africanus (The Taung child): Southern Africa (South Africa)
A.Africanus (The Taung child)Southern Africa (South Africa)
Stoneage tools in East Africa: Oldest known stone tools-3,250,000BPEvolution-3,251,950-1,9503,250,000PlioceneStoneage tools in East Africa: Oldest known stone toolsStoneage tools in East AfricaOldest known stone tools
Stoneage tools in East Africa: Oldest known Homo fossils-2,750,000BPEvolution-2,751,950-1,9502,750,000PlioceneStoneage tools in East Africa: Oldest known Homo fossilsStoneage tools in East AfricaOldest known Homo fossils
Paranthropus aethiopicus-2,700,000-2,300,000BPEvolution-2,701,950-2,301,950400,000Paranthropus aethiopicusPliocene -> PleistoceneParanthropus aethiopicus: Eastern Africa (Turkana basin of northern Kenya, southern Ethiopia)Paranthropus aethiopicusEastern Africa (Turkana basin of northern Kenya, southern Ethiopia)
Oldowan-2,600,000-1,500,000Culture-2,600,000-1,500,0001,100,000OldowanStoneage tools in East Africa - relating to or denoting an early Lower Palaeolithic culture of Africa, dated to about 2.0–1.5 million years ago
Pebble cores appear about this time: East Africa
Stoneage tools in East Africa - relating to or denoting an early Lower Palaeolithic culture of Africa, dated to about 2.0–1.5 million years ago
Pebble cores appear about this time
East Africa
Pleistocene-2,600,000-11,700BPPeriod-2,601,950-13,6502,588,300Pleistocene:
Stoneage tools in East Africa: Cooler, dryer climate in East Africa-2,500,000BPEvolution-2,501,950-1,9502,500,000PleistoceneStoneage tools in East Africa: Cooler, dryer climate in East AfricaStoneage tools in East AfricaCooler, dryer climate in East Africa
Australopithecus garhi-2,500,000-2,400,000BPEvolution-2,501,950-2,401,950100,000Australopithecus garhiPleistoceneA. garhi: Eastern Africa (the site of Bouri, Middle Awash, Ethiopia)A. garhiEastern Africa (the site of Bouri, Middle Awash, Ethiopia)
Homo habilis-2,400,000-1,400,000BPEvolution-2,401,950-1,401,9501,000,000Homo habilisPleistoceneHandy Man: Eastern and Southern Africa (Olduvai Gorge)Handy ManEastern and Southern Africa (Olduvai Gorge)
Paranthropus boisei-2,300,000-1,200,000BPEvolution-2,301,950-1,201,9501,100,000Paranthropus boiseiPleistoceneBoisei: Eastern Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi)BoiseiEastern Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi)
Stoneage tools in East Africa: H. erectus appears in the fossil record-2,000,000BPEvolution-2,001,950-1,9502,000,000PleistoceneStoneage tools in East Africa: H. erectus appears in the fossil recordStoneage tools in East AfricaH. erectus appears in the fossil record
Australopithecus sediba-1,980,000-1,977,000BPEvolution-1,981,950-1,978,9503,000Australopithecus sedibaPleistoceneAustralopithecus sediba: Southern Africa (South Africa)Australopithecus sedibaSouthern Africa (South Africa)
Homo rudolfensis-1,900,000-1,800,000BPEvolution-1,901,950-1,801,950100,000Homo rudolfensisPleistoceneH.rudolfensis: Eastern Africa (northern Kenya, possibly northern Tanzania and Malawi)H.rudolfensisEastern Africa (northern Kenya, possibly northern Tanzania and Malawi)
East Turkana (site)-1,900,000-1,500,000BPSite-1,901,950-1,501,950400,000Lower Paleolithic tools: Tool use in East AfricaLower Paleolithic toolsTool use in East Africa
Homo erectus-1,890,000-143,000BPEvolution-1,891,950-144,9501,747,000Homo erectus: Zhoukoudian (Choukoutien)Pleistocene‘Turkana Boy’: Northern, Eastern, and Southern Africa; Western Asia (Dmanisi, Republic of Georgia); East Asia (China and Indonesia)‘Turkana Boy’Northern, Eastern, and Southern Africa; Western Asia (Dmanisi, Republic of Georgia); East Asia (China and Indonesia)
Paranthropus robustus-1,800,000-1,200,000BPEvolution-1,801,950-1,201,950600,000Paranthropus robustusPleistoceneP.robustus: Southern Africa (South Africa)P.robustusSouthern Africa (South Africa)
Dmanisi (site)-1,800,000-1,650,000BPSite-1,801,950-1,651,950150,000Paranthropus robustusLower Paleolithic tools: Tool use in EuropeLower Paleolithic toolsTool use in Europe
Mojokerto (site)-1,800,000-1,850,000BPSite-1,801,950-1,851,950-50,000Lower Paleolithic tools: Tool use in JavaLower Paleolithic toolsTool use in Java
Acheulean-1,760,000-150,000BPCulture-1,761,950-151,9501,610,000AcheuleanStoneage tools in East Africa - relating to or denoting the main Lower Palaeolithic culture in Europe: Hand axes appear about this timeStoneage tools in East Africa - relating to or denoting the main Lower Palaeolithic culture in EuropeHand axes appear about this time
Nariokotome (site)-1,600,000-1,550,000BPSite-1,601,950-1,551,95050,000Lower Paleolithic tools: Tool use in East AfricaLower Paleolithic toolsTool use in East Africa
Olduvai (site)-1,450,000-750,000BPSite-1,451,950-751,950700,000Lower Paleolithic tools: Tool use in East AfricaLower Paleolithic toolsTool use in East Africa
Bouri (site)-1,240,000-900,000BPSite-1,241,950-901,950340,000Lower Paleolithic tools: Tool use in East AfricaLower Paleolithic toolsTool use in East Africa
Sima del Elefante (Atapuerca) (site)-1,210,000-1,190,000BPSite-1,211,950-1,191,95020,000Lower Paleolithic tools:Lower Paleolithic tools
Stoneage tools in East Africa: Climate shifts to 100k year glacial cycles-900,000BPEvolution-901,950-1,950900,000PleistoceneStoneage tools in East Africa: Climate shifts to 100k year glacial cyclesStoneage tools in East AfricaClimate shifts to 100k year glacial cycles
Ceprano (site)-900,000-800,000BPSite-901,950-801,950100,000Lower Paleolithic tools:Lower Paleolithic tools
Gran Dolina (Atapuerca) (site)-850,000-760,000BPSite-851,950-761,95090,000Lower Paleolithic tools:Lower Paleolithic tools
Palaeolithic, Lower-700,000-250,000BPAge-701,950-251,950450,000Homo heidelbergensisPleistocene-700000: Lithics:Hand axes Flake tools-700000Lithics:Hand axes Flake tools
Pre-historic-700,00043ADAge-700,00043700,043Pleistocene:
Homo heidelbergensis-700,000-200,000BPEvolution-701,950-201,950500,000Homo heidelbergensisPleistoceneH.hedidelbergensis: Europe; possibly Asia (China); Africa (eastern and southern)H.hedidelbergensisEurope; possibly Asia (China); Africa (eastern and southern)
Paeleolythic-500,000-10,000BPAge-501,950-11,950490,000Pleistocene-700000:-700000
Homo neanderthalis-400,000-40,000BPEvolution-401,950-41,950360,000Homo neanderthalisPleistoceneH.neanderthal - "Neandertal": Europe and southwestern to central AsiaH.neanderthal - "Neandertal"Europe and southwestern to central Asia
Palaeolithic, Middle-250,000-30,000BPAge-251,950-31,950220,000Homo neanderthalensisMiddle Pleistocene-250000:-250000
Middle Pleistocene-250,000BPPeriod-251,950-1,950250,000Homo neanderthalensis, Homo sapien, Homo floresiensisMiddle Pleistocene-250000:-250000
Homo sapien-200,0002,017BPEvolution-201,95067202,017Homo sapienMiddle Pleistocene"modern man"
: Evolved in Africa, now worldwide
"modern man"
Evolved in Africa, now worldwide
First Homo sapiens-200,000BPEvolution-201,950-1,950200,000Middle PleistoceneFirst Homo sapiens
Homo floresiensis-100,000-50,000BPEvolution-101,950-51,95050,000Homo floresiensisMiddle PleistoceneThe Hobbit: Asia (Indonesia). Liang Bua cave on the island of Flores, IndonesiaThe HobbitAsia (Indonesia). Liang Bua cave on the island of Flores, Indonesia
Palaeolithic, Upper-30,000-10,000BPAge-31,950-11,95020,000Homo sapiensLate PleistoceneLithics: Blade technology & standardised tools -30000:Lithics: Blade technology & standardised tools -30000
Upper Pleistocene-30,000BPPeriod-31,950-1,95030,000Homo sapiensUpper/Late Pleistocene: Lithics: Blade technology & standardised tools -30000Lithics: Blade technology & standardised tools -30000
Holocene-11,700BPPeriod-13,650-1,95011,700Homo sapiensHolocene:
Mesolithic-10,000-6,000BPAge-11,950-7,9504,000Late Pleistocene-10000:-10000
Stone age-6,000-2,000BCAge-6,000-2,0004,000-6000:-6000
Neolithic-4,000-2,500BCAge-4,000-2,5001,500-4000:-4000
Bronze Age-2,500-700BCAge-2,500-7001,800-2500:-2500
Roman Empire-753476ADEra-7534761,229-753. Romans threatened by Gogs and Visigogs:-753. Romans threatened by Gogs and Visigogs
Iron age-70043ADAge-70043743-700:-700
Roman Republic-518-27BCAge-518-27491-518. When Italians had kings – Pre-(Julius) Caeser:-518. When Italians had kings – Pre-(Julius) Caeser
BCE0ADevent0BCE (Before Common Era) and BC (Before Christ) mean the same thing- previous to year 1 CE (Common Era). This is the same as the year AD 1  (Anno Domini); the latter means “in the year of the lord,” often translated as “in the year of our lord.” (It was thought when the AD dating system was created that its year 1 was the year Jesus of Nazareth was born.): BCE (Before Common Era) and BC (Before Christ) mean the same thing- previous to year 1 CE (Common Era). This is the same as the year AD 1  (Anno Domini); the latter means “in the year of the lord,” often translated as “in the year of our lord.” (It was thought when the AD dating system was created that its year 1 was the year Jesus of Nazareth was born.)
Roman (Romano British)43410ADAge43410367410 is when the Romans go:410 is when the Romans go
Roman Britain43460ADAge4346041743. Caeser popped over in 55 BC:43. Caeser popped over in 55 BC
Saxon era3561066ADEra3561066710AD 356 (361-363), when Julian, later the Roman Emperor, mentioned them in a speech as allies of Magnentius. Julian (Latin: Flavius Claudius Iulianus Augustus, Greek: Φλάβιος Κλαύδιος Ἰουλιανὸς Αὔγουστος;[1] 331/332[2] – 26 June 363), also known as Julian the Apostate was Roman Emperor from 361 to 363, as well as a notable philosopher and author in Greek.[3]: AD 356 (361-363), when Julian, later the Roman Emperor, mentioned them in a speech as allies of Magnentius. Julian (Latin: Flavius Claudius Iulianus Augustus, Greek: Φλάβιος Κλαύδιος Ἰουλιανὸς Αὔγουστος;[1] 331/332[2] – 26 June 363), also known as Julian the Apostate was Roman Emperor from 361 to 363, as well as a notable philosopher and author in Greek.[3]
Early Medieval (Anglo-Saxon)4101066ADEra4101066656AKA Anglo-Saxon: Anglo-Saxon not used now because there were a lot more people involved than the Angles and the Saxons:AKA Anglo-Saxon: Anglo-Saxon not used now because there were a lot more people involved than the Angles and the Saxons
Saxon-Britain4601066ADEra4601066606(see 'Orrorin tugenensis'):(see 'Orrorin tugenensis')
Anglo-Saxon5001066ADEra5001066566:
Norman – Wales10601163ADEra10601163103:
Middle ages10661540ADAge106615404741066:1066
Medieval (Middle)10661540ADAge10661540474AKA Middle ages:AKA Middle ages
Norman – England10661071ADAge1066107151066. Battle of Hastings when William (a Frenchman) came over:1066. Battle of Hastings when William (a Frenchman) came over
Norman era10661072ADEra106610726William the Conquerer: not secure on his thrown until after 1072:William the Conquerer: not secure on his thrown until after 1072
Norman period10661135ADEra1066113569:
Plantagenets11541485ADEra11541485331a royal house which originated from the lands of Anjou in France:a royal house which originated from the lands of Anjou in France
Normans – Ireland11691203ADReign1169120334:
Tudor14851603ADEra14851603118:
Post-medieval15402017ADAge154020174771540:1540
Elizabethan15581603ADEra1558160345:
Stuart16031714ADEra16031714111:
Stuart-Jacobean16031625ADEra1603162522:
Stuart-Carolean16251649ADEra1625164924:
Stuart-(Interregnum)16491660ADEra1649166011Period between reigns in England when there was a revolt against royals: Oliver Cromwell and Richard Cromwell were anti-royalistsPeriod between reigns in England when there was a revolt against royalsOliver Cromwell and Richard Cromwell were anti-royalists
Stuart (restored)16601714ADReign1660171454Stuarts restored: Mary II 1689 - 1694
William III 1694 - 1702
Anne 1702 - 1714
Stuarts restoredMary II 1689 - 1694
William III 1694 - 1702
Anne 1702 - 1714
Stuart-Restoration16601688ADEra1660168828:
Georgian17141830ADEra17141830116:
Regency18111837ADEra1811183726:
Victorian18371901ADEra1837190164:
Edwardian19011910ADEra190119109:
Windsors191042845ADEra19104284540,935:
First World War19141918ADEra191419184:
Interwar19181939ADEra1918193921:
Second World War19391945ADEra193919456:
Postwar194542845ADEra19454284540,900:
Carbon Dating1960ADevent1960-1,960C14 dating was developed and published: Developed by Willard Libby in the late 1940s. Because of nuclear tests done in the 1950s and 1960s, the date for C14 dating is taken as 1960 (the last reliable un-affected date)C14 dating was developed and publishedDeveloped by Willard Libby in the late 1940s. Because of nuclear tests done in the 1950s and 1960s, the date for C14 dating is taken as 1960 (the last reliable un-affected date)
BP1960ADevent1960-1,960:
Post-processualist1986ADevent1986-1,986When there was a 'revolution' against processualists: Following on from Ian Hodder (and the likes of Carl Marx, etc.) in 1986 the World Archaeological Congress was established - response to the processualist ethos (by Louis Binford)When there was a 'revolution' against processualistsFollowing on from Ian Hodder (and the likes of Carl Marx, etc.) in 1986 the World Archaeological Congress was established - response to the processualist ethos (by Louis Binford)

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